APRIL TO JUNE 2014

Posted on July 9, 2014 by Kate Stephenson

  

Pip the Bedlington terrier had his first haircut and came in looking less lamblike and more sheepish . . .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artist Andy Watchorn, who showed his elegant abstract paintings at the Watchtower in June last year, played together with his wife Margaret at the Sheriff’s Dinner in the Town Hall.

 

 

In April Sakina Jones and Amy Jones presented a beautiful exhibition of paintings and historical costumes. Sakina’s radiant work delighted as always. Amy’s desirable outfits populated the Gallery for a month and I was never certain that they had not moved about during the night!

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

At the same time the Watchtower had the privilege of showing downstairs the superb embroidered images by the late Katriina Merrin.

 

 

 

 

The seal came back to the Tweed just below the Old Bridge together with a friend.

 

 

 

 

 

In May Seven Photographers filled the Gallery with an amazing range of images.   

 

During the Photographers show, MT organised an amazing concert which brought T J Johnson and his Band back to Berwick with favourite Adrian Cox playing with them again for this gig.

 

 

Two of Berwick’s handsomest musicians opened this excellent 

evening and the delighted audience audience enjoyed every moment while the Watchtower glowed late into the summer night.

 

 

 

 

  

 

The musicians went back to London, Ian Ballantyne disappeared upstairs and a small brown dog came in the front door!

Meanwhile, the Ian Stephenson Screen together with his painting Still Life Abstraction D1 went off to Vienna and on to Zurich and Berlin to feature in a major exhibition about the work of Michelangelo Antonioni and his film Blow Up in which these works feature.

During the Seven Photographers exhibition a group of children from Holy Trinity First School added their delightful work to the Gallery for three days. Once again they impressed with their thoughtful paintings and writing which owes so much to the intelligent and dedicated work of their teachers.

 

  

  

 

Nigel Chandler presented another of the popular lunchtime concerts in June and supervised the arrival of a piano via The Yardheads.

Carole Clarke sang arias and songs by Gabrielli, Brahms and Schumann together with two traditional Scottish songs arranged by Beethoven: now there is a surprise! (Well, it is to me. . .)

And more songs by the Berwick Community Choir, though rather later than Beethoven, allowed us all to join in numbers from World War 1 to the present day as a large crowd came to support the local Fundraising Group for Leukaemia and Lymphoma Research, a charity after my own heart.

  

 

The summer early morning skies are back and I have become engaged by the sight of young seagulls on a nearby chimney pot.

Of course they drive us mad with their noise and mess but I must say that their parenting skills are exemplary!

 

 

  

 

ARTHUR WOOD

BUT I MUST END ANOTHER THREE MONTHS AT THE WATCHTOWER ON, FOR US ALL, A VERY SAD NOTE.

IN THE EARLY HOURS OF THE LONGEST DAY OF THE YEAR ARTHUR WOOD ESCAPED THE WORLD AND FLEW INTO THE LIGHT.

A MAN OF ALL TALENTS, IT WAS A PRIVILEGE TO KNOW HIM AND TO HAVE THE PLEASURE OF HANGING HIS WORK AT THE WATCHTOWER. FROM HIS WONDERFUL BANNER WHICH HE MADE FOR THE LINDISFARNE EXHIBITION LAST SUMMER TO THE PRIZEWINNING CALLIGRAPHY FROM THE BRITISH LIBRARY, THE GREAT SERIES OF ILLUSTRATIONS FOR THE DENHAM TRACTS TO THE INNOVATIVE MOBILE OF QUOTES, HIS WORK NEVER FAILS TO AMUSE AND INTRIGUE.

 

  

   

 

ARTHUR, FRIENDLY, FEISTY AND FULL OF HUMOUR. AS ARE HIS BEAUTIFUL PIECES OF CALLIGRAPHY. BUT ALWAYS, JUST BELOW THE SURFACE, ARE THE DARK TRUTHS THEY EXPOSE. ANCIENT BATTLES, CONTEMPORARY STRUGGLES, LIKE WARNING CRIES BEHIND THE IMAGES OF CELEBRATION. WIND SLOWLY ALONG HIS IMAGES AND PONDER ON THE MESSAGES. EXAMINE THEM WELL. THEY MIGHT POLARISE THE REAL NEEDS OF BERWICK UPON TWEED IN THIS TIME OF DECISION MAKING. THANK YOU ARTHUR.